The Value Gap

July 25, 2011

I met a female Chinese student the other day for “language practice”. I do want to keep up my Mandarin but admittedly if the girl that turned up happened to be hot I would have nothing against attempting to bang her.

She wasn’t. They mainly aren’t: Asian students in the UK are generally geeky. But what was interesting to see the apocalyptic effect of a noticeable value gap. It was expected. It often happens in these situations.

Tall:                 +Value!

British:            +Value!

Clear English:            +Value!

Funny:                        +Value!

Bbetter looking than her:           +Value!

We talked and walked for twenty or so minutes. Everything she asked led to drive-by DHVs:

Do you work?

>I care for my sick dad but am starting an IT company with friends

How come you speak Chinese?

>My company sent me to China to work

Did you get the Metro here?

>No I drove

Etc.

It’s grotesque. After half an hour this girl thinks I’m Godlike.

You are so…. So strong. You are… a “bi niu” … a super cool person… a leader person… everyone love you… You are so intelligent… your brain is so clever… your Chinese is like a native person…

And on and on with this sycophantic blather. I don’t see eye-spazzing, drooling sexual attraction like a Western girl would feel with so much value pumping in her veins. Young, inexperienced Chinese girls are resevoirs of untapped sexual fury but it’s all behind concrete and they don’t know what to do with it. She stared at me a lot, gabbled to talk over me and endlessly tried to qualify.

It was nice for a little while but as I ultimately am not turned on by the girl I found it all a bit pointless and uncomfortable. If I meet her again I’ll try and knock it on the head and get on with some grammar. The interesting thing is seeing the effect of value on a girl. It’s dramatic. I’m toying with a theory now that value is to women what looks are to men. It’s the first bridge. Looks aren’t everything with women but for a man with options the raw sexual attraction/quality of looks has to be there. Once it’s there it’s banked and the rest is down to personality. Is value the first bridge for women? Are they genetically programmed to hunt for the biggest value gap between themselves and a man possible?

Here’s another pop-sociology explanation for one of the many fucked up things going on in the modern dating (or lack of) game:

  • Women need a value gap.
  • Give women money and jobs and status (even artificially) and there’s no value gap between them and men.
  • Cue miserable, single women all chasing Alphas because Joe Bloggs doesn’t get them past Bridge #1 like their dad (the schoolteacher) did for their mum (the shop assistant).
  • You can’t change this because people’s behaviour is in their genes.
  • Until these women (and high value men) all die out of course!

I’ve been having a think why this little Chinese girl found me so high value and I now agree. I AM high value. If I list my acheivements and capabilities it’s awesome; I think I can do great things. It’s easy to forget this. I kind of think that society makes you forget this. I feel that we live in a society where people are constantly, subtly encouraged to view their own value as lower. I think the British are steeped in it. Part jealousy. Part socialism. Part humility. Part anti-male social engineering. There’s a constant pressure to feel like you are less, not more.

Recognizing this and fighting against it is one thing, actually getting the respect you deserve is another. Forget it. It ain’t gonna happen. It’s going to take me many, many blog posts over a long period of time to fully illustrate The Grand Design, the great Conspiracy of Doom in which we’re living, but for now I’ll just randomly blurt out sentences and be too lazy to join them up:

  • Tinker with systems and they go wrong. Loosen a spring here, tighten a spring there, and soon you have a piece of clockwork in an exponential downwards curve of things going wrong. Knock on effects you don’t even imagine start to happen. Software developers see this every day.
  • Things which you tinker with less work better. They are natural. They are fair. They self-regulate.
  • Self-regulate. That’s important.
  • Society. People. Men and women living together. Getting along.
  • Fiddle a little with gender politics. Pass some laws.
  • Fail to control that which must be controlled. (someone let the chimps out)
  • Things start to go wrong. Fiddle some more. More things go wrong.
  • Marketing. Advertising. Television. Shaping people’s thoughts and ideas.
  • Wind forward a few decades.

Ta da!

A system which is a mish mash of glue, string and chewing gum. A clockwork mechanism with extra cogs, flywheels, springs and levers welded onto it, spilling out from the inside. Parts of it broken. Parts moving too fast. The hands on the clockface spinning round faster than the eye can see.

Gender relations, economics, money and society are all broken. I think a lot more than economics can be explained by the study of economics.

Let’s go back to value. The value system is broken. Utterly broken. If you have value (by my standards) your chances of having the average woman perceive and appreciate this value as she would naturally (in a non-broken system) are very small indeed.

Your options?

  1. Become a nihilist Alpha (e.g. Roissy) and just fuck while Rome burns.
  2. Anestheize yourself with TV, food and work and reproduce with a bossy woman (i.e. Herb).
  3. Leave

There’s many places in the world which have had their dalliance with socialism long ago and are more patriarchal and free market.

They’re all in Asia. See you soon DrunkenBaker.

  1. July 30, 2011 at 6:42 am | #1

    Interesting post.

    Having travelled in China myself I was shocked by how cool I suddenly was when I was there. And I thought a lot about what was going on when I got back to the UK.

    I think girls in China value a lot of things that would have been valued by women in the UK back when it was a poorer place (like the 50s).

    While the modern UK is no paradise on earth, 90% of the population are actually fairly well off. They will never go hungry, will never run out of money and become destitute, can expect to find non arduous jobs fairly easily, have all the mod cons, and should be able to go on an overseas holiday or two each year.

    The effect of this is that blokes still compete for women, they just compete politically rather than in business. Men compete politically by trying to have the most fun socially exciting lives.

    What you’ve done and can do are valued by the little Chinese girl, unfortunately these things are not so valued by the little European girl. Why not? Because (a) she doesn’t need them so much and (b) almost every male provides them to a satisfactory degree. In an age of mass affluence social power is what is valued.

  2. Chan Roo Park
    July 30, 2011 at 10:52 am | #2

    Honestly, what was modern society thinking when they allowed women to educate themselves and assume positions of power? It’s almost as if they wanted to crush the alpha male inside every man by making it more difficult to one-up the opposite sex. I think it’s Roosh that has a great diagram showing how femininity decreases with education…

    http://www.rooshv.com/the-relationship-between-femininity-education

  3. July 31, 2011 at 5:02 am | #3

    With the metaphorical little European girl meeting me:

    Tall: +Value! You get a bit of value for this, but she probably meets quite a few tall guys

    Kiwi/British: +Value! No extra value, every guy has an EU passport, plus I am not culturally exotic in any way.

    Clear English: +Value! No extra value, most European guys speak exceptional English

    Better looking than her: +Value!

    Don’t have as many fun things to do on the weekend as her: -Value!

    Don’t expect everyone to like me (lower confidence): -Value!

    Older than her (less likely to have a party life than guys her age): -Value!

    Things that fall into the same category as the bottom three are more than cancelling out any value that my looks bring.

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